Better Than a Gym!

Blog Articles

To Wheat or not to Wheat, That is the Question

http://thescienceofeating.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Book-Carbohydrates-Whole-Grains.jpg

 On going nutrition questions and controversy surrounding this American staple grain have prompted me to summarize research surrounding bread, flour and pasta.  Here is the following supported statements regarding wheat and grains by TriSystem and the National Association of Sports Nutrition.

Do you need to eat wheat?

No. You don’t need to eat any one particular food — be it grains, apples, kale, or fish.

But you need carbs. The amount of carbs you need depends on your activity level.

If you exercise fairly frequently, then you’ll likely do best with a moderate carb intake. Not getting enough could mess with your metabolism, stress hormones, and muscle-building hormones.

If you’re sedentary, have blood sugar issues, and/or need to lose a bunch of weight, then you’ll likely do best with a lower carb intake.

You could replace whole grains with a variety of other high-quality carbs, like potatoes, sweet potatoes, fruit, legumes, squash, yuca, and yams. You’d be able to get all the carbs you need, in addition to plenty of fiber and a wide array of beneficial phytonutrients.

Trying to eliminate grains entirely is going to be difficult in even the best of circumstances.

In a life that involves family holidays, birthday parties, work functions — any instance where others are preparing the food — completely cutting out grains if you’re not suffering from celiac or a sensitivity becomes way, way more trouble than it’s worth.

The position that all grains are unhealthy and should be categorically avoided is too extreme.

So is the notion that grains are inherent “superfoods” that everyone should consume in massive quantities.

Neither end of the spectrum is right.

Most people can be fit and healthy with a mixed carb intake that includes some whole grains (a few refined carbs can be OK, too).

Weigh the benefits against the risks.

Might wheat carry some low-level of risk for some people? Possibly.

Is it likely that the benefits of whole-grain wheat still outweigh this risk? Yes. The same is true for most whole grains — and whole foods — in general.  The key to nutrition and life is balance and that balance is the foundation of TriSystem.  In most cases, eliminating a whole food from your diet is a bad thing because of the nutrients it provides but, toomuch of a good thing can be a bad thing. 

Highly processed grains like white flour and  corn syrup are easily overeaten.  Better choices are sprouted grain breads like Ezekiel,  whole grain products like spinach wheat pasta and even sourdough can really minimize the overindulgence in grains.


Summarized from research  at: http://www.precisionnutrition.com/grain-wheat-debate

References:

Anderson A, et al. Whole-grain foods do not affect insulin sensitivity or markers of lipid peroxidation and inflammation in healthy, moderately overweight subjects. J Nutr. 2007;137(6):1401-1407.

Anderson AL, et al. Dietary patterns, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in older adults. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Jan;66(1):18-24.

Andersson H, et al. The effects of breads containing similar amounts of phytate but different amounts of wheat bran on calcium, zinc and iron balance in man. Br J Nutr. 1983 Nov;50(3):503-10.

Ashat M, Kochhar R. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity. Trop Gastroenterol. 2014 Apr-Jun;35(2):71-8.

Aune D, et al. Dietary fibre, whole grains, and risk of colorectal cancer: systematic review and dose-reponse meta-analysis of prospective studies. BMJ. 2011;343:d6617.

Barbaresko J, et al. Dietary pattern analysis and biomarkers of low-grade inflammation: a systematic literature review. Nutr Rev. 2013 Aug;71(8):511-27.

Biesiekierski JR, et al. No effects of gluten in patients with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates. Gastroenterology. 2013 Aug;145(2):320-8.e1-3.

Biesiekierski JR, Muir JG, Gibson PR. Is gluten a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in people without celiac disease? Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2013 Dec;13(6):631-8.

Bizzaro N, et al. Cutting-edge issues in celiac disease and in gluten intolerance. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Jun;42(3):279-87.

Brownlee IA, et al. Markers of cardiovascular risk are not changed by increased whole-grain intake: the WHOLEheart study, a randomised, controlled dietary intervention. Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(1):125-34.

Campos-Vega, Rocio, Guadalupe Loarca-Piña, and B. Dave Oomah. 2010. Minor Components of Pulses and Their Potential Impact on Human Health. Food Research International 43(2): 461–482.

Carrera-Bastos P, et al. The western diet and lifestyle and diseases of civilization. Research Reports in Clinical Cardiology. 2001;2:15-35.

Cho SS, et al. Consumption of cereal fiber, mixtures of whole grains and bran, and whole grains and risk reduction in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):594-619.

Cordain L, et al. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. Br J Nutr 2000;83:207-217.

Erickson RH, et al. Effect of lectins on the activity of brush border membrane-bound enzymes of rat small intestine. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1985;4:984-991.

Falth-Magnusson K., et al. Elevated levels of serum antibodies to the lectin wheat germ agglutinin in celiac children lend support to the gluten-lectin theory of celiac disease. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 1995;6:98-102.

Fardet A.  New hypotheses for the health-protective mechanisms of whole-grain cereals: what is beyond fibre?  Nutrition Research Reviews 2010;23:65-134.

Flight I, Clifton P. Cereal grains and legumes in the prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke: a review of the literature. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006;60(10):1145-1149.

Giacco R, et al. Whole grain intake in relation to body weight: from epidemiological evidence to clinical trials. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2011 Dec;21(12):901-8.

Gilani GS, Xiao CW, Cockell KA.  Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.  British Journal of Nutrition 2012;108:S315-S332.

Guptaa S, et al. Analysis of nutrient and antinutrient content of underutilized green leafy vegetables. LWT – Food Science and Technology. 2005 Jun;38(4):339-345.

Hamid R & Masood A. Dietary lectins as disease causing toxicants. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 2009;3:293-303.

Hokama A, et al. Roles of galectins in inflammatory bowel disease. World J Gastroenterol 2008;14:5133-5137.

Hongyu Wu, Alan J. Flint, Qibin Qi, Rob B. van Dam, Laura A. Sampson, Eric B. Rimm, Michelle D. Holmes, Walter C. Willett, Frank B. Bu, Qi Sun. “Association Between Dietary Whole Grain Intake and Risk of Mortality: Two Large Prospective Studies in US Men and Women.” JAMA Internal Medicine, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.6283, online Jan. 5, 2015

Hsu WC, et al. Improvement of Insulin Sensitivity by Isoenergy High Carbohydrate Traditional Asian Diet: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Feasibility Study. PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e106851.

Imir T & Bankhurst AD. Inhibition of Natural Killer and interleukin 2-activated NF cell cytotoxicity by monosaccharides and lectins. Mikrobiyol Bul 1987;21:245-250.

Jang Y, et al. Consumption of whole grain and legume powder reduces insulin demand, lipid peroxidation, and plasma homocysteine concentrations in patients with coronary artery disease: randomized controlled clinical trial. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2001;21(12):2065-2071.

Jenkins DJ, et al. Effect of wheat bran on glycemic control and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2002 Sep;25(9):1522-8.

Jensen MK, et al. Whole grains, bran, and germ in relation to homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(2):275-283.

Katcher HI, et al. The effects of a whole grain-enriched hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular disease risk factors in men and women with metabolic syndrome. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jan;87(1):79-90.

Kelly SA, et al. Wholegrain cereals for coronary heart disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(2):CD005051.

Leenhardt F, et al. Moderate decrease of pH by sourdough fermentation is sufficient to reduce phytate content of whole wheat flour through endogenous phytase activity. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Jan 12;53(1):98-102.

Lefevre M, Jonnalagadda S. Effect of whole grains on markers of subclinical inflammation. Nutr Rev. 2012 Jul;70(7):387-96.

Lopez HW, et al. Making bread with sourdough improves mineral bioavailability from reconstituted whole wheat flour in rats. Nutrition. 2003 Jun;19(6):524-30.

Lutsey PL, et al. Whole grain intake and its cross-sectional association with obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, diabetes and subclinical CVD: The MESA Study. Br J Nutr. 2007 Aug;98(2):397-405.

Ma Y, et al. Association between dietary fiber and markers of systemic inflammation in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Nutrition. 2008 Oct;24(10):941-9.

Maki KC, et al. Whole-grain ready-to-eat oat cereal, as part of a dietary program for weight loss, reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults with overweight and obesity more than a dietary program including low-fiber control foods. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Feb;110(2):205-14.

Masters RC, et al. Whole and refined grain intakes are related to inflammatory protein concentrations in human plasma. J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):587-94.

Pereira MA, et al. Effect of whole grains on insulin sensitivity in overweight hyperinsulinemic adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):848-55.

Pusztai A. Dietary lectins are metabolic signals for the gut and modulate immune and hormonal functions. Eur J Clin Nutr 1993;47:691-699

Pusztai A, et al. Antinutritive effects of wheat germ agglutinin and other N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins. Br J Nutr 1993;70:313-321.

Qi L, et al. Whole-grain, bran, and cereal fiber intakes and markers of systemic inflammation in diabetic women. Diabetes Care. 2006 Feb;29(2):207-11.

Rave K, et al. Improvement of insulin resistance after diet with a whole-grain based dietary product: results of a randomized, controlled cross-over study in obese subjects with elevated fasting blood glucose. Br J Nutr. 2007 Nov;98(5):929-36.

Sandström B, et al. A high oat-bran intake does not impair zinc absorption in humans when added to a low-fiber animal protein-based diet. J Nutr. 2000 Mar;130(3):594-9.

Schlemmer U, et al.  Phytate in foods and significance for humans: Food sources, intake, processing, bioavailability, protective role and analysis. Mol Nutr Food res 2009;53:S330-S375.

Singh RP & Agarwal R.  Prostate cancer and inositol hexaphosphate: efficacy and mechanisms.  Anticancer Research 2005;25:2891-2904.

Tighe P, et al. Effect of increased consumption of whole-grain foods on blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk markers in healthy middle-aged persons: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Oct;92(4):733-40

Tighe P, et al. Effects of wheat and oat-based whole grain foods on serum lipoprotein size and distribution in overweight middle aged people: a randomised controlled trial. PLoS One. 2013 Aug 5;8(8):e70436.

Venn BJ, Mann JI. Cereal grains, legumes and diabetes. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004;58(11):1443-14461.

Vitaglione P, et al. Whole-grain wheat consumption reduces inflammation in a randomized controlled trial on overweight and obese subjects with unhealthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors: role of polyphenols bound to cereal dietary fiber. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101:251–61.

 

Choose your Thanksgiving Menu the TriSystem Way! Nutritious, Beneficial, and Tasty!

The day is approaching and the choice is ultimately yours.  What are you going to fill your plate with?  How are you going to enjoy your day?

Following up on my “Battling Those Holiday Pounds” posted article, I’ve compiled the nutritional information for two traditional Turkey-day meals.  One has more calories and fat than most should consume in a whole day.  The other has 75% less calories and 90% less fat.  Both are traditional meals containing specific holiday foods.  The larger meal will most definitely cause fat to be stored.  The larger meal will cause drowsiness and discomfort for hours after the meal.  The smaller meal is balanced and fulfilling, leaving you energized and room for a small dessert meal two to three hours later.

What are you going to do on Thursday?

 

  Meal 1   Amt Description

Protein

Carbs

Fat

Calories

High Calorie Thanksgiving Day Meal, 42% of Calories from Fat
0.20 – turkey, bone removed Turkey, all classes, dark meat, meat and skin, cooked, roasted

88.85

0.00

37.30

714.27

0.75 – cup Potatoes, mashed, home-prepared, whole milk and butter added

2.96

26.32

6.66

166.95

0.33 – cup Gravy, turkey, canned

2.04

4.01

1.65

40.06

0.75 – cup Bread stuffing, bread, dry mix, prepared

4.80

32.55

12.90

267.00

1.00 – serving STOUFFER’S, Creamed Spinach, frozen

3.50

9.00

13.13

168.75

0.25 – cup Cranberry sauce, canned, sweetened

0.14

26.94

0.10

104.57

1.00 – roll (pan, dinner, or small roll) (2″ square, 2″ high) Rolls, dinner, plain, commercially prepared (includes brown-and-serve)

2.35

14.11

2.04

84.00

1.00 – pat (1″ sq, 1/3″ high) Butter, with salt

0.04

0.00

4.06

35.85

1.50 – glass (3.5 fl oz) Alcoholic beverage, wine, table, white

0.15

1.24

0.00

105.06

Meal 1

Total Grams

104.83

114.17

77.84

1686.51

Total Cal

439.57

452.8

698.63

Total Cal %

26.06

26.85

41.42

 

  Meal 2   Amt Description

Protein

Carbs

Fat

Calories

Better choice Thanksgiving Day Meal, only 20% Calories from Fat
4.00 – slices Turkey breast meat

19.35

0.00

1.36

94.60

1.00 – cup Beans, snap, green, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained without salt

2.01

8.71

0.23

37.80

1.00 – small Sweetpotato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt

1.03

14.56

0.07

61.80

0.25 – cup Gravy, mushroom, canned

0.75

3.25

1.61

29.75

1.00 – oz Bread stuffing, bread, dry mix, prepared

0.91

6.14

2.43

50.37

1.00 – roll (1 oz) Rolls, dinner, whole-wheat

2.44

14.31

1.32

74.48

0.25 – oz GFA Brands, Inc. Smart Balance

0.00

0.00

2.25

8.02

4.00 – fl oz Apple juice, frozen concentrate, unsweetened, diluted with 3 volume water without added ascorbic acid

0.17

13.80

0.12

56.21

8.00 – fl oz Carbonated beverage, club soda

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Meal 2

Total Grams

26.66

60.77

9.39

413.03

Total Cal

106.9

238.67

84.12

Total Cal %

25.88

57.79

20.37

 

 

 

 

 

How “NATURAL” is this ingredient in the food you’re eating?

A client just asked me about this Almond Milk Creamer. Check it out…

SilkAlmondCreamer2

There it is again that ambiguous ingredient “natural flavor” Research shows that even with all the regulations and new organic certifications it’s a confusing and misleading mess!

The definition of natural flavor under the Code of Federal Regulations is: “the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional” (21CFR101.22).

Certainly a mouthful!

In other words, it could include beef by-products, but not necessarily.

Any other added flavor therefore is artificial. (Although monosodium glutamate, or MSG, used to flavor food must be declared on the label as such, similar additives or derivatives of MSG that are not exactly that chemical could be listed as natural flavoring.  Example of these are autolyzed yeast extract and hydrolyzed soy protein). Both artificial and natural flavors are made by “flavorists” in a laboratory by blending either “natural” chemicals or “synthetic” chemicals to create flavorings.

Gary Reineccius, a professor in the department of food science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota, explains that  the distinction between natural and artificial flavorings is based on the source of these often identical chemicals. In fact, he says, “artificial flavorings are simpler in composition and potentially safer because only safety-tested components are utilized.

 “Another difference,” says Reineccius, “is cost. The search for natural sources of chemicals often requires that a manufacturer go to great lengths to obtain a given chemical.  This natural chemical is identical to the version made in an organic chemist’s laboratory, yet it is much more expensive than the synthetic alternative.”

End result: Consumers wind up paying the price for natural flavorings, and according to Reineccius, these are in fact no better in quality, nor are they safer, than their cost-effective artificial counterparts.

So what about the flavorings used in organic foods? Foods certified by the National Organic Program (NOP) must be grown and processed using organic farming methods without synthetic pesticides, bioengineered genes, petroleum-based fertilizers and sewage sludge-based fertilizers. Organic livestock cannot be fed antibiotics or growth hormones. The term “organic” is not synonymous with “natural.” The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) defines “natural” as “a product containing no artificial ingredient or added color and is only minimally processed (a process which does not fundamentally alter the raw product) may be labeled natural.” Most foods labeled natural, including its flavorings, are not subject to government controls beyond the regulations and heath codes.

The NOP food labeling standards (effective October of 2002) include a National List of Allowed Synthetic and Prohibited Substances. This list has a section on allowed non-synthetic substances, some with restrictions (205.605(a)) for products labeled “organic” or “made with organic ingredients.” Four categories of organic labels were approved by the USDA, based on the percentage of organic content: 100% Organic, Organic, Made with Organic Ingredients, and Less than 70% Organic. Natural flavors, then, can be considered NOP compliant as “organic” when used under the 95% rule (flavorings constitute 5% or less of total ingredients and meet that meet the appropriate requirements) if their organic counterparts are not available. “Made with organic ingredients” can be used on any product with at least 70% organically produced ingredients.”

According to the National List, under section 7CFR205.605(a)(9), non-agricultural, non-organic substances are allowed as ingredients that can be labeled as “organic” or “made with organic,” including “flavors, non-synthetic sources only, and must not be produced using synthetic solvents and carrier systems or any artificial preservative.” Other non-synthetic ingredients allowed in this section include: acids such as microbiologically-produced citric acid, dairy cultures, certain enzymes and non-synthetic yeast that is not grown on petrochemical substrates and sulfite waste liquor.

So, the bottom line is that you have to read those labels carefully. “Natural” might not be so natural, and that even some organic foods might contain some of these “natural flavors.” There are still many grey areas for consumers and producers alike.

Research is being done and attempts are being made to produce more organic flavorings, but the process is slow. We as consumers need to be more aware of what ingredients go into our foods and also demand that the government sticks to its responsibility to regulate these ingredients and make sure that the information is discloses on EVERY label.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ehow.com/list_7409993_fda-regulations-natural-flavors.html
http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC5088008
http://www.scientificamerican.com
http://www.kisswebpage.com/msg/

Your Thanksgiving Day Strategy

The Bird

Battling those Holiday Pounds!

Studies show the average weight gain around this time of year among those who are weight conscious is five to ten pounds. Those who are not concerned about weight could gain a whole lot more. So what’s the answer? Avoid all the delicious, good food surrounding the various holidays this time of year. Dramatically cut back on everything else. If this was the answer, the holiday weight gain statistic would not exist. Forgo the food connected with our holiday celebrations and you might as well skip the whole holiday season. Since becoming a hermit is not the healthy answer for weight and body composition maintenance, we must find another answer.

That solution, in a nut shell (pardon the pun) is variety and moderation. Specifically, the number of meals you eat per day will definitely influence pending weight gain. Even the most meticulous calorie counters realize that they need a specific amount of calories per day. So they save up their calories for that one special meal. Have you every skipped breakfast or only had a light snack to eat before Thanksgiving? It seems to makes sense. If your limit your calories to 1,500 a day, why not in one delicious, holiday splurge. The problem with this calorie math is your body is only capable of processing food at a specific rate. For example: if a man is dying of dehydration, it will not benefit him to connect a fire hose to his mouth. The water just can get in that fast. Therefore, to be in energy balance, over the time it takes to consume a meal and the time it takes to digest and absorb that meal, we should be burning close to the same amount of calories.

It is not the amount of calories we eat per day that matters but, the amount of calories and nutrients we consume per meal.  So how do we apply this to the holiday season. Don’t think you’re doing well by sleeping late, skipping meals, waiting for that one big meal. Don’t set your body up for laying in the couch, watching television while it attempts to process this breakfast-lunch-and-dinner-in-one. You’ve just lowered your daily calorie expenditure, increasing the chance that your body will store most of what you’re eating as fat.

Skipping meals and then exercising very hard, right before the big meal increases calories burned but, if you haven’t eaten very much since the night before, you could actually slow your metabolism, burning muscle. Exercise helps curb the appetite in some people but, actually increases it in most because of the temporary calorie deficit.

The right way:

Your body likes routine. If you normally get up at a certain time, get up at that time. Try and eat as soon as you wake and eat breakfast, snacks and lunch like you normally would. If exercise is part of your routine, then keep it there. If it is not, this is not the day to start. Eating meals at the time you normally eat them will actually raise metabolism (compared to skipping) and give you nutrients and calories when your body needs them. This will reduce cravings and hunger before your holiday meal, especially if you have a snack or meal right before you get together. Don’t deny yourself the traditional holiday foods. Fighting to avoid them usually ends up in one or two melt downs that are worse than if you served yourself with various samples.

Thanksgiving DinnerThe key is portion control and variety. A plate that has a little of everything is better than a plate that only has the biggest baked potato. Try and put a little of everything on your plate, even if you don’t particularly care for something. The more you try new and different foods, the more likely you are eating a balanced meal. Don’t use the biggest plate, either. Choose to fill a smaller plate or, when given a larger one, fill your plate out to the sides. Try not to stack food high. Keep it all the same level. If there is a boarder or pattern in the china, attempt to serve yourself within the lines. Be sure to get some protein, carbohydrate, vegetable and a little fat. Drink between eight and sixteen ounces of fluid with your meal, water being the first choice.

With a snack before, a full day of eating, routine exercise and a well balanced plate, we should all survive the holidays with little weight gain and a good taste of everything. Having a little of everything eases the pressure of trying to decide what to eat, satisfies your taste buds and balances your meal. Have fun with family and friends this holiday season but, not at the expense of growing out of those jeans around New Year’s resolution time. Good luck and God Bless!!

Comparison of traditional Thanksgiving Day meals.  See This link

Choose your Thanksgiving meal

Jeff Kotterman is the recommended Sports Nutritionist for several fitness based businesses. He is an experienced instructor whose research has benefited the health of thousands clients. If you have questions or would like a program developed specifically for you call (858) 694-0317, e-mail: jeff@trisystem.com

A Really Good Source for Vegan Recipes

As a sports nutritionist, the subject of vegetarianism is quite controversial.  Validated as an alternative therapy to treat forms of inflammation, heart disease and even cancer, various degrees of vegetarianism have been shown to be effective.  Viewed as extreme by some, especially those meat lovers, vegetarians have their place among environmentalists and alternative practitioners.

My question is:  Can someone maintain optimal performance or body composition on a vegan diet?  Is it possible to maintain or even increase skeletal muscle mass without animal protein in the diet?  As a practicing master sports nutritionist, I have found it to be challenging to write menus that stay within targeted macronutrient and calorie ranges without foods that are mostly protein.

None the less, in a back-to-the basics interview with one of my mentors, the grandfather of fitness, the late, great Jack LaLane, I was asked by Jack, "Do you eat the recommended 3-5 services of vegetables a day?"  I did not.  In the latest NASN Personal Training textbook it recommends replacing meat, including fish and chicken with fruits, veggies and whole grains as main dishes.  So even for fitness and performance, it is now becoming widely accepted that  the meat on your plate should be more like a side than the main dish.

So the question remains:  how do we get all these veggies in and make them delicious.  Steamed broccoli every night just does not sound like a good time.

Problem solved.  My good friend and colleague, Liz Eddy has created a great contemporary website of vegan recipes that gets updated regularly with new ideas from her juice to her desserts, I'm sure you'll find something you like, I know I did. 

Check it out: http://fitfoods.com

and whether your vegan or not, Eat your veggies!

Heart Disease or Cancer: Pick one! or NOT!

Let's forget about the economy or the election or gas prices for one minute.  Don't you realize that there is something much more important going on here? All these other things are distractions.  They may even be distracting you to the point of death.  Yes, death!  Sound extreme? Well it isn't.  Take a moment to receive this reality check.  Regardless of all the medical advancements, research, new medications and treatments, the American lifespan has decreased by as much as 5 years. (references for this article provided at the end).

Here are the facts:

  • heart disease is the leading cause of death in America

  • cancer is the second leading cause of death in America

  • cancer is the leading cause of death in American children, ages 1-14

 

 

Get ready!  If you haven't mourned the premature lose of a friend or family member, the odds are, you will in the near future.  I've dealt with cancer myself in 1998.  Between my family, my clients and my church, I deal with several people a day fighting the battle against these two leading killers.  It's simply overwhelming.  The damage these diseases are causing is widespread.  A solution to these health problems would have such an economic, social and even spiritual impact, it would change the world. 

What would the world be like with no Heart Disease or Cancer?

We already spend millions and millions of dollars in treatment and research for the cure.  What can we do more?  What if it was already out there?  Well It is!  Yes, I said… it is.  No this is not some magic pill.  No it's not from a late night infomercial or multi-level–marketing company.  This is REAL!

The Facts:

  • 80% of all heart disease deaths can be prevented through this method!

  • 80% of all cancer deaths can be prevented through this method!

That's right.  Most of the deaths in American can be prevented if we just implement this method today.  The problem with the method is that it is difficult to do and, even if you implement this protocol, there are still 20% who will still get these diseases.  So what if you or a member of your family are part of that 20%?  Is it still worth trying something difficult to do in order to prevent suffering and premature death?  You tell me!  I'd hate to be one of those people with regrets.  What's worse than dying from a degenerative disease is facing the fact that you may have prevented it.  That is much harder than doing what it takes to keep these diseases away.

The answer…

The method…

The protocol…

Is radically changing the way you eat.  It is committing to vigorous exercise most days a week.  It is being conscious of your environment and what you expose yourself to.  It is paying attention to the water you drink, the air you breath and the sleep you get.  It is being conscious of what you expose your body to, inside and out.   The main problem with this solution is that it is summed up in an easy answer called a healthy lifestyle program.

The problem with a healthy lifestyle program is that if you ask most people if they follow a healthy lifestyle, they would say YES! And they're not even close.

We are just fooling ourselves.  For the first time in history, if the statistics are not changed, this generation may outlive their children.  Did you comprehend that last sentence?  We may soon be burying our children from epidemic diseases like diabetes, obesity and heart disease.  We are already seeing it from cancer!  Visit a children's hospital.  Ask St. Jude's Cancer Center for Children.  You can stand by and let it happen, or you can do something about it right now!

  • Do the hard thing!  Get the right eating plan…and follow it!

  • Get on a progressive fitness plan that you will do most days…and do it!

  • Take high nutrient, low calorie anti-oxidants to help clean the free radicals out of our bodies!

 

Oh, yeah, that's the TriSystem Program.  It's been around for almost 20 years and it has radically changed the lives of those who are committed to change.  It keeps changing everyday.  If you've been on the program before, you better get an update because, things have… radically changed!

The Choice is yours: Heart Disease or Cancer:  Pick one!  or NOT.

In San Diego?  Time to come in and get on track before Halloween candy, Football parties,  The Election, Thanksgiving leftovers, Christmas Party Bonuses, Christmas Dinner Leftovers, Hanukah, Quanza and New Years Hangovers pick one for you!  Call 858-694-0317.

Don't want to come in?  Too far away?  Become a platinum member and get what a real Healthy Lifestyle Program Is! Click Here.

Check out tomorrow's post for a video on the same subject!

 

References:

NASN Personal Trainer Text: Principles and Labs for Fitness and Wellness, 11th Edition, 2012, Werner W. K. Hoeger, Sharon A. Hoeger , Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Belmont, CA 94002-3098

 

 

Are you on Vacation? What about Mobile Food Component Choices?

Are you on Vacation? Not Cooking at home?

Your long weekend could really use some mobile protein.  This is where my friends, Egon and Eric of Nutrimart have several products, just for this purpose.  The hardest part of traveling is mobile protein. Yes, you should have protein in every meal when possible.  Don't skip a meal if there is simply no protein.  Here are some mobile meal components:
 
Mobile/Convenient Proteins:
 
NutriMart
Quest bars (1 bar is a serving)
Whey Protein (1/2 scoop is a serving)
Complete Cookies (1/2 is a serving)
Liquid Isopure (1/2 bottle is a serving)
 
Supermarket/convenience store
Greek Yogurt (4 oz)
Cottage Cheese (4 oz.)
Edemame (4 oz)
Hardboiled egg
Turkey Sandwhich (1/2)
Albacore Tuna Packets or single serving cans
 
Mobile/Convenient Fats:
Walnuts (tbs.)
Almonds (tbs.)
Peanuts (tbs.)
Macadamian nuts (tbs.)
Order olive oil and vinegar on a salad, out (tbs.)
 
Mobile/Convenient Carbs:

all fruits and Vegetables (limited to 2 cups per meal)

Refreshing Summertime Snacks That Help You Lose Weight!

 

Refreshing summertime snacks that help

you lose weight!

 

 

Who doesn't love snacking? A great trick to staying lean for your summer is keeping healthy, refreshing snacks on hand. Eating often, especially incorporating fresh fruits and veggies is known to speed up your metabolism and keep you energized! These low calorie nibbles will satisfy your taste buds so you're not eyeballing those forbidden sinful temptations. These healthy snacks will fill you up and burn off quick, leaving you feeling refreshed, not weighed down! 

 

Watermelon

 

Sweet, crisp, quenching! Watermelon is SO refreshing on a hot summer day. Scoop it in to balls and keep it chilled in the fridge. The high volume due to the water content will make you feel full as well as hydrated. One cup of balls is just 46 calories with 21% of your daily value of vitamin C! Great for a fun snack or if you're still hungry after a meal!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jicama

 

This root veggie sort of tastes like a cross between a raw potato and an apple. Crisp and firm but juicy with a pleasantly mild sweetness. 1 cup has just 46 calories and is very filling. Also 6 grams of fiber and a whopping 40% of your daily vitamin C! Jicama is delicious on it's own but for a kick you can add cayenne pepper which works as a natural appetite suppressant. Sprinkle it along with some lemon juice and salt and you have yourself a tasty low calorie FILLING summer snack!  Add some almonds and a low fat protein like Greek yogurt and you have a balanced snack!  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yogurt Veggie Dip

 

 

This flavorful dip is high in protein, low in fat and super easy to make! Keep this in the fridge and you will be eating a lot more raw veggies! 1 cup fat free or 2% Greek yogurt, 1 tbsp onion powder, 1 tbsp chopped dried onions, 1 tsp garlic powder, 1 tsp lemon juice, 1 tbsp chopped chives and a few drops of setvia. 

 

 

Stevia Lemonade 

 

I have to admit, stevia is one of those things that has to grow on you. You might not like it at first if you try it paired with the wrong thing. For example it doesn't shine so much in coffee or green tea, but it is excellent in citrus! Once you acquire a taste for stevia and learn what it goes well with, you may never go back to table sugar again! Let me tell you, it tastes GREAT in lemonade!!! And did you know lemon juice have very little calories but it makes you feel full? It also alkalizes your body, has cleansing properties and is packed with vitamin C among MANY other health benefits. Make a big batch of this and I promise you; you will be drinking a lot more water and you won't be as hungry throughout the day.

 

For one large glass squeeze 1 whole lemon in about 12 oz of water and add about 16 drops of stevia. Add fresh mint leaves or crushed ginger for something extra! One glass is just 15 calories containing 50% of your daily vitamin C value!

Note:[Jeff advises men to limit their stevia intake to less than 1 tbs. per day]. 

 

 

 

 

Sweet Tuna Crunchers

 

You might be thinking, "I'm not a big fan of tuna". I was like you once. This tuna is different!!!! I am about to share with you one of my most favorite secret recipes. I got it from my best friends mother and ever since I tried it for the first time; hooked! What's unique about this tuna salad is that it's sweet and not fishy at all because I add….drum roll please…..pineapple! The intensely sweet acidy essence of the pineapple perfectly balances the salty fishiness of the tuna. Using drained, crushed pineapple blends with the texture of the tuna so well that your kids, husband and/or friends won't even know it's in there. They will wonder what the heck it is about THIS tuna that makes it SO fresh and delicious! And when you replace the mayonnaise with Greek yogurt this snack is GREAT for the figure! 

 

2 5oz cans tuna (solid white is best)

1 15 oz can of crushed pineapple (VERY well drained)

4 or 5 tbsp Greek yogurt

dash of salt & pepper (if desired)

Optional:

Dried cranberries, diced apples, chopped walnuts, celery

 

(Serve atop cucumber slices cut in thick round pieces

or slice cucumber lengthwise, scoop out seeds and serve taco style)

 

These are some great ideas from your friendly TriSystem Fitness Chef, Monique Michaud.  Want more of my recipes?  Become a member of my Trisystem Cafe` Club, where all the real cool "Foodies" go for some of my best recipes and food secrets as well as my opinion on restaurant dishes.  For a short time, Club membership is only $10.  Click here!

 

Call 858-694-0317 to schedule a session where I cook for you.

 

 

What Bars and Shakes Should I Choose?

The Skinny on Shakes:

I've reviewed a lot of shakes and drink mixes.  My TriSystem Pre and Post workout shakes (members get my shake recipes on their menus.  Click here to become a member) are designed to not be refrigerated.  They are just a mix of powders that you can put in a shaker bottle and just add water when you're about to drink them.  Another option for the shakes are meal replacement packets by  Lee Labrada. They come in a box and you can also put them in a shaker bottle or water bottle.  Already made drinks that are liquid need to be refrigerated and are more expensive, generally  One that does not have to be refrigerated , but tastes best cold is the Isopure Zero Carb Liquid protein.  These are in glass bottles and work well with fruit and a few almonds.

 

The Deal With Bars:

Many bars have bad fats in them that could increase inflammation and actually store more fat.  Stock up on the Perfect Food Bars, they are made right here in San Diego.  Most Henry's stores have them. Check out the store locator on their website, http://www.perfectfoodsbar.com.  The Heart Thrive bars are also a "better bar"  the best place to get them is online at http://www.suncakes.com/Heart%20Thrive%20nutrition.htm.  They need to be refrigerated to last.  I order a lot and freeze some.  These are my first choice bars.   If you just can't find the time to get them, my second choices, for convenience are: 1.  A Clif Builder Bar or (3rd choice) just a Clif Bar or a Small MET-Rx Bar. These can be found in most grocery stores, even convenience stores and gas stations, but they are not as good as the Perfect Food Bars or the Heart Thrive for clean, non-GMO eating on the go.

 

Secrets to Eating Better Than Before!

To connect with Santos, my client seen above, visit his website at www.santosministries.orgSantos also works with drug and alcohol rehab resources.  Feel free to contact him anytime.

Before Jack LaLane died, I had a chance to talk with him in a radio interview. I asked him this question: "What do you think is harder to do: exercise correctly or eat right? You'll never guess what he said. In another post, I'll share a link to that interview. Our opinions differ in this question. Exercising 5 days a week is great for fitness, you only have to make the right decision 5 times in a whole week. Eating correctly is a little more challenging for me because I eat 5 or 6 times a day. That's 30+ correct decisions per week. Not only do I have to choose to stop and eat at the right time, I also have to choose to eat the right foods in the correct portions. That's a lot more decision making!
That is why you need to plan what your eating for the day. You need to know what you're going to eat before its time to eat. And it's gotta have the right nutrients in the right portions for the right amount of calories. That way each meal, your keeping your metabolism up while fat burning and muscle building at the same time. That is why I created the Cafe Club. We need to have a place to go that knows who we are, what we like, what we need and most of all…. What we should eat! Want to know what you should eat? Become a member:

To get the Premium TriSystem experience, join my Platinum Club, click here.

To focus on your food, join my Cafe Club, showing you what's the best for your body to eat, click here.

20120318-140602.jpg