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To Wheat or not to Wheat, That is the Question

http://thescienceofeating.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Book-Carbohydrates-Whole-Grains.jpg

 On going nutrition questions and controversy surrounding this American staple grain have prompted me to summarize research surrounding bread, flour and pasta.  Here is the following supported statements regarding wheat and grains by TriSystem and the National Association of Sports Nutrition.

Do you need to eat wheat?

No. You don’t need to eat any one particular food — be it grains, apples, kale, or fish.

But you need carbs. The amount of carbs you need depends on your activity level.

If you exercise fairly frequently, then you’ll likely do best with a moderate carb intake. Not getting enough could mess with your metabolism, stress hormones, and muscle-building hormones.

If you’re sedentary, have blood sugar issues, and/or need to lose a bunch of weight, then you’ll likely do best with a lower carb intake.

You could replace whole grains with a variety of other high-quality carbs, like potatoes, sweet potatoes, fruit, legumes, squash, yuca, and yams. You’d be able to get all the carbs you need, in addition to plenty of fiber and a wide array of beneficial phytonutrients.

Trying to eliminate grains entirely is going to be difficult in even the best of circumstances.

In a life that involves family holidays, birthday parties, work functions — any instance where others are preparing the food — completely cutting out grains if you’re not suffering from celiac or a sensitivity becomes way, way more trouble than it’s worth.

The position that all grains are unhealthy and should be categorically avoided is too extreme.

So is the notion that grains are inherent “superfoods” that everyone should consume in massive quantities.

Neither end of the spectrum is right.

Most people can be fit and healthy with a mixed carb intake that includes some whole grains (a few refined carbs can be OK, too).

Weigh the benefits against the risks.

Might wheat carry some low-level of risk for some people? Possibly.

Is it likely that the benefits of whole-grain wheat still outweigh this risk? Yes. The same is true for most whole grains — and whole foods — in general.  The key to nutrition and life is balance and that balance is the foundation of TriSystem.  In most cases, eliminating a whole food from your diet is a bad thing because of the nutrients it provides but, toomuch of a good thing can be a bad thing. 

Highly processed grains like white flour and  corn syrup are easily overeaten.  Better choices are sprouted grain breads like Ezekiel,  whole grain products like spinach wheat pasta and even sourdough can really minimize the overindulgence in grains.


Summarized from research  at: http://www.precisionnutrition.com/grain-wheat-debate

References:

Anderson A, et al. Whole-grain foods do not affect insulin sensitivity or markers of lipid peroxidation and inflammation in healthy, moderately overweight subjects. J Nutr. 2007;137(6):1401-1407.

Anderson AL, et al. Dietary patterns, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in older adults. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Jan;66(1):18-24.

Andersson H, et al. The effects of breads containing similar amounts of phytate but different amounts of wheat bran on calcium, zinc and iron balance in man. Br J Nutr. 1983 Nov;50(3):503-10.

Ashat M, Kochhar R. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity. Trop Gastroenterol. 2014 Apr-Jun;35(2):71-8.

Aune D, et al. Dietary fibre, whole grains, and risk of colorectal cancer: systematic review and dose-reponse meta-analysis of prospective studies. BMJ. 2011;343:d6617.

Barbaresko J, et al. Dietary pattern analysis and biomarkers of low-grade inflammation: a systematic literature review. Nutr Rev. 2013 Aug;71(8):511-27.

Biesiekierski JR, et al. No effects of gluten in patients with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates. Gastroenterology. 2013 Aug;145(2):320-8.e1-3.

Biesiekierski JR, Muir JG, Gibson PR. Is gluten a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in people without celiac disease? Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2013 Dec;13(6):631-8.

Bizzaro N, et al. Cutting-edge issues in celiac disease and in gluten intolerance. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Jun;42(3):279-87.

Brownlee IA, et al. Markers of cardiovascular risk are not changed by increased whole-grain intake: the WHOLEheart study, a randomised, controlled dietary intervention. Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(1):125-34.

Campos-Vega, Rocio, Guadalupe Loarca-Piña, and B. Dave Oomah. 2010. Minor Components of Pulses and Their Potential Impact on Human Health. Food Research International 43(2): 461–482.

Carrera-Bastos P, et al. The western diet and lifestyle and diseases of civilization. Research Reports in Clinical Cardiology. 2001;2:15-35.

Cho SS, et al. Consumption of cereal fiber, mixtures of whole grains and bran, and whole grains and risk reduction in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):594-619.

Cordain L, et al. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. Br J Nutr 2000;83:207-217.

Erickson RH, et al. Effect of lectins on the activity of brush border membrane-bound enzymes of rat small intestine. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1985;4:984-991.

Falth-Magnusson K., et al. Elevated levels of serum antibodies to the lectin wheat germ agglutinin in celiac children lend support to the gluten-lectin theory of celiac disease. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 1995;6:98-102.

Fardet A.  New hypotheses for the health-protective mechanisms of whole-grain cereals: what is beyond fibre?  Nutrition Research Reviews 2010;23:65-134.

Flight I, Clifton P. Cereal grains and legumes in the prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke: a review of the literature. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006;60(10):1145-1149.

Giacco R, et al. Whole grain intake in relation to body weight: from epidemiological evidence to clinical trials. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2011 Dec;21(12):901-8.

Gilani GS, Xiao CW, Cockell KA.  Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.  British Journal of Nutrition 2012;108:S315-S332.

Guptaa S, et al. Analysis of nutrient and antinutrient content of underutilized green leafy vegetables. LWT – Food Science and Technology. 2005 Jun;38(4):339-345.

Hamid R & Masood A. Dietary lectins as disease causing toxicants. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 2009;3:293-303.

Hokama A, et al. Roles of galectins in inflammatory bowel disease. World J Gastroenterol 2008;14:5133-5137.

Hongyu Wu, Alan J. Flint, Qibin Qi, Rob B. van Dam, Laura A. Sampson, Eric B. Rimm, Michelle D. Holmes, Walter C. Willett, Frank B. Bu, Qi Sun. “Association Between Dietary Whole Grain Intake and Risk of Mortality: Two Large Prospective Studies in US Men and Women.” JAMA Internal Medicine, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.6283, online Jan. 5, 2015

Hsu WC, et al. Improvement of Insulin Sensitivity by Isoenergy High Carbohydrate Traditional Asian Diet: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Feasibility Study. PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e106851.

Imir T & Bankhurst AD. Inhibition of Natural Killer and interleukin 2-activated NF cell cytotoxicity by monosaccharides and lectins. Mikrobiyol Bul 1987;21:245-250.

Jang Y, et al. Consumption of whole grain and legume powder reduces insulin demand, lipid peroxidation, and plasma homocysteine concentrations in patients with coronary artery disease: randomized controlled clinical trial. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2001;21(12):2065-2071.

Jenkins DJ, et al. Effect of wheat bran on glycemic control and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2002 Sep;25(9):1522-8.

Jensen MK, et al. Whole grains, bran, and germ in relation to homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(2):275-283.

Katcher HI, et al. The effects of a whole grain-enriched hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular disease risk factors in men and women with metabolic syndrome. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jan;87(1):79-90.

Kelly SA, et al. Wholegrain cereals for coronary heart disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(2):CD005051.

Leenhardt F, et al. Moderate decrease of pH by sourdough fermentation is sufficient to reduce phytate content of whole wheat flour through endogenous phytase activity. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Jan 12;53(1):98-102.

Lefevre M, Jonnalagadda S. Effect of whole grains on markers of subclinical inflammation. Nutr Rev. 2012 Jul;70(7):387-96.

Lopez HW, et al. Making bread with sourdough improves mineral bioavailability from reconstituted whole wheat flour in rats. Nutrition. 2003 Jun;19(6):524-30.

Lutsey PL, et al. Whole grain intake and its cross-sectional association with obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, diabetes and subclinical CVD: The MESA Study. Br J Nutr. 2007 Aug;98(2):397-405.

Ma Y, et al. Association between dietary fiber and markers of systemic inflammation in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Nutrition. 2008 Oct;24(10):941-9.

Maki KC, et al. Whole-grain ready-to-eat oat cereal, as part of a dietary program for weight loss, reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults with overweight and obesity more than a dietary program including low-fiber control foods. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Feb;110(2):205-14.

Masters RC, et al. Whole and refined grain intakes are related to inflammatory protein concentrations in human plasma. J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):587-94.

Pereira MA, et al. Effect of whole grains on insulin sensitivity in overweight hyperinsulinemic adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):848-55.

Pusztai A. Dietary lectins are metabolic signals for the gut and modulate immune and hormonal functions. Eur J Clin Nutr 1993;47:691-699

Pusztai A, et al. Antinutritive effects of wheat germ agglutinin and other N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins. Br J Nutr 1993;70:313-321.

Qi L, et al. Whole-grain, bran, and cereal fiber intakes and markers of systemic inflammation in diabetic women. Diabetes Care. 2006 Feb;29(2):207-11.

Rave K, et al. Improvement of insulin resistance after diet with a whole-grain based dietary product: results of a randomized, controlled cross-over study in obese subjects with elevated fasting blood glucose. Br J Nutr. 2007 Nov;98(5):929-36.

Sandström B, et al. A high oat-bran intake does not impair zinc absorption in humans when added to a low-fiber animal protein-based diet. J Nutr. 2000 Mar;130(3):594-9.

Schlemmer U, et al.  Phytate in foods and significance for humans: Food sources, intake, processing, bioavailability, protective role and analysis. Mol Nutr Food res 2009;53:S330-S375.

Singh RP & Agarwal R.  Prostate cancer and inositol hexaphosphate: efficacy and mechanisms.  Anticancer Research 2005;25:2891-2904.

Tighe P, et al. Effect of increased consumption of whole-grain foods on blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk markers in healthy middle-aged persons: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Oct;92(4):733-40

Tighe P, et al. Effects of wheat and oat-based whole grain foods on serum lipoprotein size and distribution in overweight middle aged people: a randomised controlled trial. PLoS One. 2013 Aug 5;8(8):e70436.

Venn BJ, Mann JI. Cereal grains, legumes and diabetes. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004;58(11):1443-14461.

Vitaglione P, et al. Whole-grain wheat consumption reduces inflammation in a randomized controlled trial on overweight and obese subjects with unhealthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors: role of polyphenols bound to cereal dietary fiber. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101:251–61.

 

Choose your Thanksgiving Menu the TriSystem Way! Nutritious, Beneficial, and Tasty!

The day is approaching and the choice is ultimately yours.  What are you going to fill your plate with?  How are you going to enjoy your day?

Following up on my “Battling Those Holiday Pounds” posted article, I’ve compiled the nutritional information for two traditional Turkey-day meals.  One has more calories and fat than most should consume in a whole day.  The other has 75% less calories and 90% less fat.  Both are traditional meals containing specific holiday foods.  The larger meal will most definitely cause fat to be stored.  The larger meal will cause drowsiness and discomfort for hours after the meal.  The smaller meal is balanced and fulfilling, leaving you energized and room for a small dessert meal two to three hours later.

What are you going to do on Thursday?

 

  Meal 1   Amt Description

Protein

Carbs

Fat

Calories

High Calorie Thanksgiving Day Meal, 42% of Calories from Fat
0.20 – turkey, bone removed Turkey, all classes, dark meat, meat and skin, cooked, roasted

88.85

0.00

37.30

714.27

0.75 – cup Potatoes, mashed, home-prepared, whole milk and butter added

2.96

26.32

6.66

166.95

0.33 – cup Gravy, turkey, canned

2.04

4.01

1.65

40.06

0.75 – cup Bread stuffing, bread, dry mix, prepared

4.80

32.55

12.90

267.00

1.00 – serving STOUFFER’S, Creamed Spinach, frozen

3.50

9.00

13.13

168.75

0.25 – cup Cranberry sauce, canned, sweetened

0.14

26.94

0.10

104.57

1.00 – roll (pan, dinner, or small roll) (2″ square, 2″ high) Rolls, dinner, plain, commercially prepared (includes brown-and-serve)

2.35

14.11

2.04

84.00

1.00 – pat (1″ sq, 1/3″ high) Butter, with salt

0.04

0.00

4.06

35.85

1.50 – glass (3.5 fl oz) Alcoholic beverage, wine, table, white

0.15

1.24

0.00

105.06

Meal 1

Total Grams

104.83

114.17

77.84

1686.51

Total Cal

439.57

452.8

698.63

Total Cal %

26.06

26.85

41.42

 

  Meal 2   Amt Description

Protein

Carbs

Fat

Calories

Better choice Thanksgiving Day Meal, only 20% Calories from Fat
4.00 – slices Turkey breast meat

19.35

0.00

1.36

94.60

1.00 – cup Beans, snap, green, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained without salt

2.01

8.71

0.23

37.80

1.00 – small Sweetpotato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt

1.03

14.56

0.07

61.80

0.25 – cup Gravy, mushroom, canned

0.75

3.25

1.61

29.75

1.00 – oz Bread stuffing, bread, dry mix, prepared

0.91

6.14

2.43

50.37

1.00 – roll (1 oz) Rolls, dinner, whole-wheat

2.44

14.31

1.32

74.48

0.25 – oz GFA Brands, Inc. Smart Balance

0.00

0.00

2.25

8.02

4.00 – fl oz Apple juice, frozen concentrate, unsweetened, diluted with 3 volume water without added ascorbic acid

0.17

13.80

0.12

56.21

8.00 – fl oz Carbonated beverage, club soda

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Meal 2

Total Grams

26.66

60.77

9.39

413.03

Total Cal

106.9

238.67

84.12

Total Cal %

25.88

57.79

20.37

 

 

 

 

 

Your Thanksgiving Day Strategy

The Bird

Battling those Holiday Pounds!

Studies show the average weight gain around this time of year among those who are weight conscious is five to ten pounds. Those who are not concerned about weight could gain a whole lot more. So what’s the answer? Avoid all the delicious, good food surrounding the various holidays this time of year. Dramatically cut back on everything else. If this was the answer, the holiday weight gain statistic would not exist. Forgo the food connected with our holiday celebrations and you might as well skip the whole holiday season. Since becoming a hermit is not the healthy answer for weight and body composition maintenance, we must find another answer.

That solution, in a nut shell (pardon the pun) is variety and moderation. Specifically, the number of meals you eat per day will definitely influence pending weight gain. Even the most meticulous calorie counters realize that they need a specific amount of calories per day. So they save up their calories for that one special meal. Have you every skipped breakfast or only had a light snack to eat before Thanksgiving? It seems to makes sense. If your limit your calories to 1,500 a day, why not in one delicious, holiday splurge. The problem with this calorie math is your body is only capable of processing food at a specific rate. For example: if a man is dying of dehydration, it will not benefit him to connect a fire hose to his mouth. The water just can get in that fast. Therefore, to be in energy balance, over the time it takes to consume a meal and the time it takes to digest and absorb that meal, we should be burning close to the same amount of calories.

It is not the amount of calories we eat per day that matters but, the amount of calories and nutrients we consume per meal.  So how do we apply this to the holiday season. Don’t think you’re doing well by sleeping late, skipping meals, waiting for that one big meal. Don’t set your body up for laying in the couch, watching television while it attempts to process this breakfast-lunch-and-dinner-in-one. You’ve just lowered your daily calorie expenditure, increasing the chance that your body will store most of what you’re eating as fat.

Skipping meals and then exercising very hard, right before the big meal increases calories burned but, if you haven’t eaten very much since the night before, you could actually slow your metabolism, burning muscle. Exercise helps curb the appetite in some people but, actually increases it in most because of the temporary calorie deficit.

The right way:

Your body likes routine. If you normally get up at a certain time, get up at that time. Try and eat as soon as you wake and eat breakfast, snacks and lunch like you normally would. If exercise is part of your routine, then keep it there. If it is not, this is not the day to start. Eating meals at the time you normally eat them will actually raise metabolism (compared to skipping) and give you nutrients and calories when your body needs them. This will reduce cravings and hunger before your holiday meal, especially if you have a snack or meal right before you get together. Don’t deny yourself the traditional holiday foods. Fighting to avoid them usually ends up in one or two melt downs that are worse than if you served yourself with various samples.

Thanksgiving DinnerThe key is portion control and variety. A plate that has a little of everything is better than a plate that only has the biggest baked potato. Try and put a little of everything on your plate, even if you don’t particularly care for something. The more you try new and different foods, the more likely you are eating a balanced meal. Don’t use the biggest plate, either. Choose to fill a smaller plate or, when given a larger one, fill your plate out to the sides. Try not to stack food high. Keep it all the same level. If there is a boarder or pattern in the china, attempt to serve yourself within the lines. Be sure to get some protein, carbohydrate, vegetable and a little fat. Drink between eight and sixteen ounces of fluid with your meal, water being the first choice.

With a snack before, a full day of eating, routine exercise and a well balanced plate, we should all survive the holidays with little weight gain and a good taste of everything. Having a little of everything eases the pressure of trying to decide what to eat, satisfies your taste buds and balances your meal. Have fun with family and friends this holiday season but, not at the expense of growing out of those jeans around New Year’s resolution time. Good luck and God Bless!!

Comparison of traditional Thanksgiving Day meals.  See This link

Choose your Thanksgiving meal

Jeff Kotterman is the recommended Sports Nutritionist for several fitness based businesses. He is an experienced instructor whose research has benefited the health of thousands clients. If you have questions or would like a program developed specifically for you call (858) 694-0317, e-mail: jeff@trisystem.com

Did you Miss the Nutrition Seminar? Well Here it is….

Thank you all for coming back on the 12th to listen to me talk again on nutrition.  If you missed it, you can watch it or re-watch it below.  I got a lot of positive feedback from those who attended.  They say they were motivated by it.  The talk was called, “Eating for Pleasure and Benefit.”    Here is a flyer that was my second choice.  It is a good graphic of what is explained in  the presentation:

Challenge Nutrition Seminar

Watch the seminar here: http://youtu.be/lgKmaQ1ho2c

It All Starts Today!

The Future Starts TodayFriday’s seminar was a blast!  for those of you who attended, thanks for coming.  If you didn’t make it, I’m sorry you missed it.  We are Working on getting the video up for all to see.  Even if you missed it, you still have a chance to start the TriSystem EDGE challenge this week.  It all Starts today!  Three important things to do this week:

  • 1.  Schedule a time for your initial assessment and measurements.  Call 858-694-0317 or text your affiliate, or just reply to this email.

 

  • 2.  If you don’t already have a TriSystem online account, go to http://platinumclub.trisystem.com and put your name, phone and email to start the process.  Don’t worry, you’re not going to have to pay for your online program.  I will activate it for free once your challenge fees have been processed.

 

  • 3.  Download your log sheets here.  Affiliates, please use the this log sheet to verify contestant activities.  Be sure you have the right sheet.  One says contestant and one says affiliate.

You have to verify that you actually did each event that qualifies for points with a TriSystem Affiliate.  If you have trouble getting to an affiliate,  just send us a picture of you actually doing the event with your phone and email or text it to us.  Be honest.  photo-shopped and staged stuff will not be accepted.  Make sure the images show you clearly and show what you are doing clearly.  Don’t hide your face. document your workouts

Is There Really Brain Food?

For those of you who missed it, here is the April 2nd news spot on San Diego Living, Channel 6

 (see the video here)

We’ve all had those days when we just feel like our brain is in a fog.  And while there’s no magic pill (or is there?) to bring us back to the height of our cognitive powers, there are some foods and nutrients that have been shown to improve brain function, protect against age-associated cognitive decline and encourage focus and clarity.  But before you dismiss the diet-brain connection let me tell you there has been study after study that has found a relationship between what we put in our mouths and how well we can perform important thinking and memory tasks. While certain nutrients may specifically assist brain function, there is also the totality of our diets to consider. Also, several well-regarded studies have shown that meal timing is an important predictor of performance.

For example, research shows that eating breakfast can improve the memory and acquisition skills of schoolchildren. In a finding sure to fuel the debate over the harms of saturated fat, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital published a study last year suggesting that saturated fats — found in red meat and full-fat dairy products — causes the brain to age more rapidly than other kinds of fat. Olive oil, avocado, and other monounsaturated fats appear to slow brain aging.

I’ve put together the top brain foods — tell me Friday if any have made a difference for you. We all could use a little extra oomph up there?

·         Walnuts help promote blood flow, which in turn allows for efficient delivery of oxygen to the brain.

·         Olive oil is a great source of monounsaturated fat, which has been shown to actually slow brain aging.

·         Berries –  Neuro-research found that a diet high in blueberries, strawberries and others were linked to a slower mental decline in areas like memory and focus in a large sample of middle-aged women.

·         Fatty fish like sardines and salmon are a well-known brain booster, thanks to the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, which have been linked to lower risk of dementia, improved focus and memory.

·         Spinach is rich in the antioxidant lutein, which is thought to help protect against cognitive decline, according to researchers from Tufts University.

·         Avocados are full of monounsaturated fats that improve vascular health and blood flow, making them another brain food.

·         Water – When a person becomes dehydrated, their brain tissue actually shrinks. And several studies have shown that dehydration can affect cognitive function.  Dehydration can impair short-term memory, focus and decision making.

·         Garlic may help stave off some forms of brain cancer, according to research published in Cancer, the medical journal of the American Cancer Society. Investigators found that the organo-sulfur compounds in garlic actually worked to kill brain cancer cells.

The key to successfully implementing these foods for effectiveness is in balancing them.  Remember, too much of a good thing is a bad thing.  At the Seminar Friday, we will talk about how to combine these foods and other herbs and botanicals for optimal brain function.

Over decades of study and working with thousands of clients, I’ve developed a single product that has a key all-natural combination affecting Mood. Metabolism and Recovery as it says on the bottle

It all starts on my birthday, this Friday, April 5th at a FREE seminar in San Diego where San Diego 6 viewers can get a chance to enter to receive all of this free.  All views have to do is register at www.trisystem.info/san-diego-6. That enters you in a drawing to be announced at the seminar.  More information about the location is on that page.  It starts at 6:30. I hope to see you there!

What is the Leading Cause of Death in San Diego?

It's not what you think.  We are different than everywhere else in America.  Watch this short video to find out your most likely way to die in San Diego, Ca and how to prevent it.

 

Call 858-694-0317

A Really Good Source for Vegan Recipes

As a sports nutritionist, the subject of vegetarianism is quite controversial.  Validated as an alternative therapy to treat forms of inflammation, heart disease and even cancer, various degrees of vegetarianism have been shown to be effective.  Viewed as extreme by some, especially those meat lovers, vegetarians have their place among environmentalists and alternative practitioners.

My question is:  Can someone maintain optimal performance or body composition on a vegan diet?  Is it possible to maintain or even increase skeletal muscle mass without animal protein in the diet?  As a practicing master sports nutritionist, I have found it to be challenging to write menus that stay within targeted macronutrient and calorie ranges without foods that are mostly protein.

None the less, in a back-to-the basics interview with one of my mentors, the grandfather of fitness, the late, great Jack LaLane, I was asked by Jack, "Do you eat the recommended 3-5 services of vegetables a day?"  I did not.  In the latest NASN Personal Training textbook it recommends replacing meat, including fish and chicken with fruits, veggies and whole grains as main dishes.  So even for fitness and performance, it is now becoming widely accepted that  the meat on your plate should be more like a side than the main dish.

So the question remains:  how do we get all these veggies in and make them delicious.  Steamed broccoli every night just does not sound like a good time.

Problem solved.  My good friend and colleague, Liz Eddy has created a great contemporary website of vegan recipes that gets updated regularly with new ideas from her juice to her desserts, I'm sure you'll find something you like, I know I did. 

Check it out: http://fitfoods.com

and whether your vegan or not, Eat your veggies!

Jeff Kotterman Receives Official Title…

I am pleased to announce that I've been selected to be the Official Pageant Physique Consultant for the Miss California Intercontinental Pageants.  This includes consulting for the Junior T.E.E.N California and The Miss T.E.E.N California Pageants as well.  Miss California Intercontinental is the official state preliminary to the Miss United States Intercontinental Pageant. The coveted tiara that the winner of this pageant wears is the most expensive crown used in all of the events of this nature, valued as it is at 335,000 USD.  The pageants will be Presented by AJ Beauty, the pageants will be held the spring of 2013 in Southern California. 

Because of my strong convictions towards good health and a healthy physique, I am an advocate of conveying a balanced, healthy image in a community where beauty, high standards and the American obesity epidemic intersect.  There is still a lingering stigma among the ignorant  that pageantry promotes unhealthy, underweight  images of women destined for the fashion runway.  At the same time the standard of acceptable and healthy weight keeps rising as the average American gets heavier and heavier each year.

As a Licensed Master Sports Nutritionist and the current Director of the National Association of Sports Nutrition, I am proud to have the opportunity to consult these fine young women and to provide the latest nutrition and exercise strategies for optimum results.  It has become more difficult than ever to maintain a healthy body in this highly technological, fast paced society.  Mindful eating and purposeful exercise just seem to be more of an idea rather than a reality.  With 2013 fast approaching, the up and coming women of our modern society are not only exposing themselves to the traditional challenges of pageantry but, also the hyper criticism of being viewed as too thin or too fat or both by the scrutinizing public.

It is my job as the official pageant physique consultant for these pageants to ensure these women achieve their personal best and to validate  that they are as healthy and as happy as they can be.  I provide professional assessment, program development and follow up that includes specific nutrition and exercise advice.  My experience has spanned over 20 years with thousands of clients, many who have achieved different titles in all walks of life.  For more information about how I can help you present your best at your next pageant go to http://trisystem.info/contact/ and tell me more about you or just call 858-694-0317 and ask for Jeff.

If you'd like a reference, any of the women below will gladly speak on my behalf or just ask Liz Eddy or Robin Senne.

What to Do About Holiday Eating…

Battling those Holiday Pounds!

Studies show the average weight gain around this time of year among those who are weight conscious is five to ten pounds. Those who are not concerned about weight could gain a whole lot more.   So what’s the answer?  Avoid all the delicious, good food surrounding the various holidays this time of year.  Dramatically cut back on everything else.  If this was the answer, the holiday weight gain statistic would not exist.  Forgo the food connected with our holiday celebrations and you might as well skip the whole holiday season.  Since becoming a hermit is not the healthy answer for  weight and body composition maintenance, we must find another answer.

That solution, in a nut shell (pardon the pun) is variety and moderation.  Specifically, the number of meals you eat per day will definitely influence pending weight gain.  Even the most meticulous calorie counters realize that they need a specific amount of calories per day.  So they save up their calories for that one special meal.   Have you every skipped breakfast or only had a light snack to eat before Thanksgiving?  It seems to makes sense.  If your limit your calories to 1,500 a day, why not in one delicious, holiday splurge. The problem with this calorie math is  your body is only capable of processing food at a specific rate.  For example: if a man is dying of dehydration, it will not benefit him to connect a fire hose to his mouth.  The water just can get in that fast.  Therefore, to be in energy balance, over the time it takes to consume a meal and the time it takes to digest and absorb that meal, we should be burning close to the same amount of calories.  It is not the amount of calories we eat per day that matters but, the amount of calories and nutrients we consume per meal.

So how do we apply this to the holiday season.  Don’t think your doing well by sleeping late, skipping meals, waiting for that one big meal.  Don’t set your body up for laying in the couch, watching television while it attempts to process this breakfast-lunch-and-dinner-in-one.  You’ve just lowered your daily calorie expenditure, increasing the chance that your body will store most of what your eating as fat.

Skipping meals and then exercising very hard, right before the big meal increases calories burned but, if you haven’t eaten very much since the night before, you could actually slow your metabolism, burning muscle.  Exercise helps curb the appetite in some people but, actually increases it in most because of the temporary calorie deficit.

The right way:  Your body likes routine.  If you normally get up at a certain time, get up at that time.  Try and eat as soon as you wake and eat breakfast, snacks and lunch like you normally would.  If exercise is part of your routine, then keep it there.  If it is not, this is not the day to start.  Eating meals at the time you normally eat them will actually raise metabolism (compared to skipping) and give you nutrients and calories when your body needs them.  This will reduce cravings and hunger before your holiday meal, especially if you have a snack or meal right before you get together.  Don’t deny yourself the traditional holiday foods.  Fighting to avoid them usually ends up in one or two melt downs that are worse than if you served yourself with various samples.  The key is portion control and variety.  A plate that has a little of everything is better than a plate that only has the biggest baked potato.  Try and put a little of everything on your plate, even if you don’t particularly care for something.  The more you try new and different foods, the more likely you are eating a balanced meal.  Don’t use the biggest plate, either.  Choose to fill a smaller plate or, when given a larger one, fill your plate out to the sides. Try not to stack food high.  Keep it all the same level.  If there is a boarder or pattern in the china, attempt to serve yourself within the lines.  Be sure to get some protein, carbohydrate, vegetable and a little fat.  Drink between eight and sixteen ounces of fluid with your meal, water being the first choice.

With a snack before, a full day of eating, routine exercise and a well balanced plate, we should all survive the holidays with little weight gain and a good taste of everything.  Having a little of everything eases the pressure of trying to decide what to eat, satisfies your taste buds and balances your meal.  Have fun with family and friends this holiday season but, not at the expense of  growing out of those jeans around New Years resolution time.  Good luck and God Bless!!

Jeff Kotterman is the recommended Sports Nutritionist for several fitness based businesses.  He is an experienced instructor whose research has benefited the health of thousands clients.   If you have questions or would like a program developed specifically for you call (858) 694-0317, e-mail: jeff@trisystem.com or at www.trisystem.com