Better Than a Gym!

Free Outside Fitness events in San Diego, Ca

Image result for san Diego park

This is what TriSystem Results look like…

Do you wonder what you’ll accomplish by next month?  How about by next year?  Do you really want to be fit or do you just like the idea of it?  Do you really want to make it a priority or do you think one day of eating no bread and a walk around the block is going to do it?  Come on!  Get Serious!!!

Check this out…


​​

How do fit people PARTY???

 

Well, we don’t party like this…

Image result for workout party

Don’t come dressed like this 80’s nightmare.

We are having a TriSystem Cinco De Mayo party, Friday May 5th fro m 5:30-8 pm.  Come hang with other TriSystem members and clients and meet people who are looking to be fit, be happy and have good fun!

Dress casual for a fun Friday night!  Are you coming?

 

Image result for healthy tacos

February is Fatburning-fix-it month!

  • What can you do in 28 days?  
  • What if you had all the tools needed to maximize fat loss and you really focused for 28 days? 
  • What could you accomplish? 

Video link: https://youtu.be/OSbB3zNMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSbB3zNM9Bc9Bc

It starts with an accurate body fat and assessment.  Then we do scientifically designed 30 minute workouts most days a week at either 9:30 am and/or 6:30 pm.  10 am on Saturdays and off on Sundays.  Add specific fat-burning, muscle building meals designed for you and supplements based on your individual physical traits.

And you get GREAT RESULTS FOR A GREAT CAUSE.

Just $97 for new members.

Call Me at 858-694-0317 to get started!

 

Jeff Kotterman

 

When you feel like putting your fitness on “Pause.”

If you’re trying to improve your own health and fitness… it’s an absolute MUST READ.

“I’ll resume healthy eating/exercising after vacation… once the baby is born… after Dad gets out of the hospital… January 1… Monday.”

While this kind of Pause-Button Mentality may seem reasonable, it could be ruining YOUR health and fitness efforts.  Here’s why, and what you can do about it…

What’s the harm in “pausing” healthy habits when life gets crazy?  Well, this completely natural and well-meaning impulse is one of thefastest, surest, most reliable ways to SABOTAGE YOUR efforts.

It may give YOU temporary relief… along with the cozy illusion that if YOU “start fresh”, YOU”LL find the magical “right time” to begin.

But, unfortunately, there will never be a perfect time to hit “play” again. You and I both know –perfection just doesn’t happen in real life.

The Solution:  You simply “adjust the dial”. Here’s how…
Small improvementsdone consistently over time.

So today, let’s shift from an “all-or-nothing” mentality…
which usually gets YOU “nothing”…
…to an “always-something” approach, where YOU can still make progress…
I always say:

“The only bad workout is a missed workout.”

…even amid vacations, demanding work schedules, family demands, injuries, emergencies.

If you can just keep moving forward, no matter what happens, no pause buttons, no do-overs… you’ll WIN. And I win too.

Make the TriSystem Shift from  “all or nothing” to “always something” for success in 2017!

Start by making February your “Always Something” month.  Email or message me about our 28 Day Pounds For Dollars Challenge stating January 31st.

Jeff Kotterman

jeff@trisystem.com

To Wheat or not to Wheat, That is the Question

http://thescienceofeating.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Book-Carbohydrates-Whole-Grains.jpg

 On going nutrition questions and controversy surrounding this American staple grain have prompted me to summarize research surrounding bread, flour and pasta.  Here is the following supported statements regarding wheat and grains by TriSystem and the National Association of Sports Nutrition.

Do you need to eat wheat?

No. You don’t need to eat any one particular food — be it grains, apples, kale, or fish.

But you need carbs. The amount of carbs you need depends on your activity level.

If you exercise fairly frequently, then you’ll likely do best with a moderate carb intake. Not getting enough could mess with your metabolism, stress hormones, and muscle-building hormones.

If you’re sedentary, have blood sugar issues, and/or need to lose a bunch of weight, then you’ll likely do best with a lower carb intake.

You could replace whole grains with a variety of other high-quality carbs, like potatoes, sweet potatoes, fruit, legumes, squash, yuca, and yams. You’d be able to get all the carbs you need, in addition to plenty of fiber and a wide array of beneficial phytonutrients.

Trying to eliminate grains entirely is going to be difficult in even the best of circumstances.

In a life that involves family holidays, birthday parties, work functions — any instance where others are preparing the food — completely cutting out grains if you’re not suffering from celiac or a sensitivity becomes way, way more trouble than it’s worth.

The position that all grains are unhealthy and should be categorically avoided is too extreme.

So is the notion that grains are inherent “superfoods” that everyone should consume in massive quantities.

Neither end of the spectrum is right.

Most people can be fit and healthy with a mixed carb intake that includes some whole grains (a few refined carbs can be OK, too).

Weigh the benefits against the risks.

Might wheat carry some low-level of risk for some people? Possibly.

Is it likely that the benefits of whole-grain wheat still outweigh this risk? Yes. The same is true for most whole grains — and whole foods — in general.  The key to nutrition and life is balance and that balance is the foundation of TriSystem.  In most cases, eliminating a whole food from your diet is a bad thing because of the nutrients it provides but, toomuch of a good thing can be a bad thing. 

Highly processed grains like white flour and  corn syrup are easily overeaten.  Better choices are sprouted grain breads like Ezekiel,  whole grain products like spinach wheat pasta and even sourdough can really minimize the overindulgence in grains.


Summarized from research  at: http://www.precisionnutrition.com/grain-wheat-debate

References:

Anderson A, et al. Whole-grain foods do not affect insulin sensitivity or markers of lipid peroxidation and inflammation in healthy, moderately overweight subjects. J Nutr. 2007;137(6):1401-1407.

Anderson AL, et al. Dietary patterns, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in older adults. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Jan;66(1):18-24.

Andersson H, et al. The effects of breads containing similar amounts of phytate but different amounts of wheat bran on calcium, zinc and iron balance in man. Br J Nutr. 1983 Nov;50(3):503-10.

Ashat M, Kochhar R. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity. Trop Gastroenterol. 2014 Apr-Jun;35(2):71-8.

Aune D, et al. Dietary fibre, whole grains, and risk of colorectal cancer: systematic review and dose-reponse meta-analysis of prospective studies. BMJ. 2011;343:d6617.

Barbaresko J, et al. Dietary pattern analysis and biomarkers of low-grade inflammation: a systematic literature review. Nutr Rev. 2013 Aug;71(8):511-27.

Biesiekierski JR, et al. No effects of gluten in patients with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates. Gastroenterology. 2013 Aug;145(2):320-8.e1-3.

Biesiekierski JR, Muir JG, Gibson PR. Is gluten a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in people without celiac disease? Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2013 Dec;13(6):631-8.

Bizzaro N, et al. Cutting-edge issues in celiac disease and in gluten intolerance. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Jun;42(3):279-87.

Brownlee IA, et al. Markers of cardiovascular risk are not changed by increased whole-grain intake: the WHOLEheart study, a randomised, controlled dietary intervention. Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(1):125-34.

Campos-Vega, Rocio, Guadalupe Loarca-Piña, and B. Dave Oomah. 2010. Minor Components of Pulses and Their Potential Impact on Human Health. Food Research International 43(2): 461–482.

Carrera-Bastos P, et al. The western diet and lifestyle and diseases of civilization. Research Reports in Clinical Cardiology. 2001;2:15-35.

Cho SS, et al. Consumption of cereal fiber, mixtures of whole grains and bran, and whole grains and risk reduction in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):594-619.

Cordain L, et al. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. Br J Nutr 2000;83:207-217.

Erickson RH, et al. Effect of lectins on the activity of brush border membrane-bound enzymes of rat small intestine. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1985;4:984-991.

Falth-Magnusson K., et al. Elevated levels of serum antibodies to the lectin wheat germ agglutinin in celiac children lend support to the gluten-lectin theory of celiac disease. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 1995;6:98-102.

Fardet A.  New hypotheses for the health-protective mechanisms of whole-grain cereals: what is beyond fibre?  Nutrition Research Reviews 2010;23:65-134.

Flight I, Clifton P. Cereal grains and legumes in the prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke: a review of the literature. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006;60(10):1145-1149.

Giacco R, et al. Whole grain intake in relation to body weight: from epidemiological evidence to clinical trials. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2011 Dec;21(12):901-8.

Gilani GS, Xiao CW, Cockell KA.  Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.  British Journal of Nutrition 2012;108:S315-S332.

Guptaa S, et al. Analysis of nutrient and antinutrient content of underutilized green leafy vegetables. LWT – Food Science and Technology. 2005 Jun;38(4):339-345.

Hamid R & Masood A. Dietary lectins as disease causing toxicants. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 2009;3:293-303.

Hokama A, et al. Roles of galectins in inflammatory bowel disease. World J Gastroenterol 2008;14:5133-5137.

Hongyu Wu, Alan J. Flint, Qibin Qi, Rob B. van Dam, Laura A. Sampson, Eric B. Rimm, Michelle D. Holmes, Walter C. Willett, Frank B. Bu, Qi Sun. “Association Between Dietary Whole Grain Intake and Risk of Mortality: Two Large Prospective Studies in US Men and Women.” JAMA Internal Medicine, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.6283, online Jan. 5, 2015

Hsu WC, et al. Improvement of Insulin Sensitivity by Isoenergy High Carbohydrate Traditional Asian Diet: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Feasibility Study. PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e106851.

Imir T & Bankhurst AD. Inhibition of Natural Killer and interleukin 2-activated NF cell cytotoxicity by monosaccharides and lectins. Mikrobiyol Bul 1987;21:245-250.

Jang Y, et al. Consumption of whole grain and legume powder reduces insulin demand, lipid peroxidation, and plasma homocysteine concentrations in patients with coronary artery disease: randomized controlled clinical trial. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2001;21(12):2065-2071.

Jenkins DJ, et al. Effect of wheat bran on glycemic control and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2002 Sep;25(9):1522-8.

Jensen MK, et al. Whole grains, bran, and germ in relation to homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(2):275-283.

Katcher HI, et al. The effects of a whole grain-enriched hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular disease risk factors in men and women with metabolic syndrome. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jan;87(1):79-90.

Kelly SA, et al. Wholegrain cereals for coronary heart disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(2):CD005051.

Leenhardt F, et al. Moderate decrease of pH by sourdough fermentation is sufficient to reduce phytate content of whole wheat flour through endogenous phytase activity. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Jan 12;53(1):98-102.

Lefevre M, Jonnalagadda S. Effect of whole grains on markers of subclinical inflammation. Nutr Rev. 2012 Jul;70(7):387-96.

Lopez HW, et al. Making bread with sourdough improves mineral bioavailability from reconstituted whole wheat flour in rats. Nutrition. 2003 Jun;19(6):524-30.

Lutsey PL, et al. Whole grain intake and its cross-sectional association with obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, diabetes and subclinical CVD: The MESA Study. Br J Nutr. 2007 Aug;98(2):397-405.

Ma Y, et al. Association between dietary fiber and markers of systemic inflammation in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Nutrition. 2008 Oct;24(10):941-9.

Maki KC, et al. Whole-grain ready-to-eat oat cereal, as part of a dietary program for weight loss, reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults with overweight and obesity more than a dietary program including low-fiber control foods. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Feb;110(2):205-14.

Masters RC, et al. Whole and refined grain intakes are related to inflammatory protein concentrations in human plasma. J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):587-94.

Pereira MA, et al. Effect of whole grains on insulin sensitivity in overweight hyperinsulinemic adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):848-55.

Pusztai A. Dietary lectins are metabolic signals for the gut and modulate immune and hormonal functions. Eur J Clin Nutr 1993;47:691-699

Pusztai A, et al. Antinutritive effects of wheat germ agglutinin and other N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins. Br J Nutr 1993;70:313-321.

Qi L, et al. Whole-grain, bran, and cereal fiber intakes and markers of systemic inflammation in diabetic women. Diabetes Care. 2006 Feb;29(2):207-11.

Rave K, et al. Improvement of insulin resistance after diet with a whole-grain based dietary product: results of a randomized, controlled cross-over study in obese subjects with elevated fasting blood glucose. Br J Nutr. 2007 Nov;98(5):929-36.

Sandström B, et al. A high oat-bran intake does not impair zinc absorption in humans when added to a low-fiber animal protein-based diet. J Nutr. 2000 Mar;130(3):594-9.

Schlemmer U, et al.  Phytate in foods and significance for humans: Food sources, intake, processing, bioavailability, protective role and analysis. Mol Nutr Food res 2009;53:S330-S375.

Singh RP & Agarwal R.  Prostate cancer and inositol hexaphosphate: efficacy and mechanisms.  Anticancer Research 2005;25:2891-2904.

Tighe P, et al. Effect of increased consumption of whole-grain foods on blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk markers in healthy middle-aged persons: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Oct;92(4):733-40

Tighe P, et al. Effects of wheat and oat-based whole grain foods on serum lipoprotein size and distribution in overweight middle aged people: a randomised controlled trial. PLoS One. 2013 Aug 5;8(8):e70436.

Venn BJ, Mann JI. Cereal grains, legumes and diabetes. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004;58(11):1443-14461.

Vitaglione P, et al. Whole-grain wheat consumption reduces inflammation in a randomized controlled trial on overweight and obese subjects with unhealthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors: role of polyphenols bound to cereal dietary fiber. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101:251–61.

 

Save Thousands of dollars and change your LIFE like Wasim!

There is an incredible opportunity to make 2017 a transformation year.  TriSystem doesn’t just change your bodyfat, it changes your life.  Wasim Hajjiri is making an international difference and breaking the stereotype for immigration in America.  He is helping to bridge the gap between cultures, religions and ethnic diversity in America and he did it using TriSystem.  Check it out!

If you’re inspired, take this opportunity to change your life and others in 2017. Let Team TriSystem help you male a difference in 2017.  Wasim did!

christmas-sale-2016-2

The TriSystem FIX if you’ve eaten too much over the Thanksgiving weekend!

It’s that time of year, in the middle of the holiday season when we are fattening and looking for ways to get all the festivities done.  Party, celebrate and eat more.  Working out and eating right gets pushed right out the door.   Well…Just because you’re not doing the right thing right now doesn’t mean you won’t in 2017.

We all know we need to eat better and exercise more and TriSystem wants to make that happen with our famous end of the year SALE.  It’s just like we do every year but even better this year.  The sale is the same as previous years.  If you know you’re going to be training in 2017, why not commit to it now and save hundreds, even thousands of $$ by paying for it in one cash payment for the whole year.  That’s it!  Save by making the commitment.  Clients say they come more if they’ve paid for the year in advance.  Do it!  It’s a win win!

Here’s what’s new…

Research shows that the more often you train, the better your results.  its not about how hard you train or how long you workout.  Those who workout more often get fit and stay fit longer.  So,  members who are training at least 2 times a week and paying $359 or more per month get

our Unlimited FitCamp! Class Pass for FREE! 

Yup!  now you can get 3,4.5 or even 6 TriSystem Workouts in a week and make 2017 the year you transformed!

christmas-sale-2016-2

Get the EDGE this Holiday Season with this Black Friday Price for the best workout supplement!

From now until Saturday get EDGE for less than wholesale price. 

The number one botanical combination for MOOD, METABOLISM and RECOVERY! 

Check it out…

Buy Here!

 

Choose your Thanksgiving Menu the TriSystem Way! Nutritious, Beneficial, and Tasty!

The day is approaching and the choice is ultimately yours.  What are you going to fill your plate with?  How are you going to enjoy your day?

Following up on my “Battling Those Holiday Pounds” posted article, I’ve compiled the nutritional information for two traditional Turkey-day meals.  One has more calories and fat than most should consume in a whole day.  The other has 75% less calories and 90% less fat.  Both are traditional meals containing specific holiday foods.  The larger meal will most definitely cause fat to be stored.  The larger meal will cause drowsiness and discomfort for hours after the meal.  The smaller meal is balanced and fulfilling, leaving you energized and room for a small dessert meal two to three hours later.

What are you going to do on Thursday?

 

  Meal 1   Amt Description

Protein

Carbs

Fat

Calories

High Calorie Thanksgiving Day Meal, 42% of Calories from Fat
0.20 – turkey, bone removed Turkey, all classes, dark meat, meat and skin, cooked, roasted

88.85

0.00

37.30

714.27

0.75 – cup Potatoes, mashed, home-prepared, whole milk and butter added

2.96

26.32

6.66

166.95

0.33 – cup Gravy, turkey, canned

2.04

4.01

1.65

40.06

0.75 – cup Bread stuffing, bread, dry mix, prepared

4.80

32.55

12.90

267.00

1.00 – serving STOUFFER’S, Creamed Spinach, frozen

3.50

9.00

13.13

168.75

0.25 – cup Cranberry sauce, canned, sweetened

0.14

26.94

0.10

104.57

1.00 – roll (pan, dinner, or small roll) (2″ square, 2″ high) Rolls, dinner, plain, commercially prepared (includes brown-and-serve)

2.35

14.11

2.04

84.00

1.00 – pat (1″ sq, 1/3″ high) Butter, with salt

0.04

0.00

4.06

35.85

1.50 – glass (3.5 fl oz) Alcoholic beverage, wine, table, white

0.15

1.24

0.00

105.06

Meal 1

Total Grams

104.83

114.17

77.84

1686.51

Total Cal

439.57

452.8

698.63

Total Cal %

26.06

26.85

41.42

 

  Meal 2   Amt Description

Protein

Carbs

Fat

Calories

Better choice Thanksgiving Day Meal, only 20% Calories from Fat
4.00 – slices Turkey breast meat

19.35

0.00

1.36

94.60

1.00 – cup Beans, snap, green, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained without salt

2.01

8.71

0.23

37.80

1.00 – small Sweetpotato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt

1.03

14.56

0.07

61.80

0.25 – cup Gravy, mushroom, canned

0.75

3.25

1.61

29.75

1.00 – oz Bread stuffing, bread, dry mix, prepared

0.91

6.14

2.43

50.37

1.00 – roll (1 oz) Rolls, dinner, whole-wheat

2.44

14.31

1.32

74.48

0.25 – oz GFA Brands, Inc. Smart Balance

0.00

0.00

2.25

8.02

4.00 – fl oz Apple juice, frozen concentrate, unsweetened, diluted with 3 volume water without added ascorbic acid

0.17

13.80

0.12

56.21

8.00 – fl oz Carbonated beverage, club soda

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Meal 2

Total Grams

26.66

60.77

9.39

413.03

Total Cal

106.9

238.67

84.12

Total Cal %

25.88

57.79

20.37